This second book in the author’s Raisina Series takes you through the power corridors of the country through the eyes of a young second generation power broker. Told in first person the story takes you through the journey of this young man who comes from Sikh community, adding to the earlier heroes who were Hindu and Muslim respectively. The context is set by giving what the protagonist has inherited from his father and how he takes it up, willingly but sometimes questioning, but then discovering that power broking is too much ingrained in his existence to think of himself without it.

There is all the drama, twists and turns in the fast paced story. There are all elements of politics that we know of, a power broker related to the ex-army chief turned president who is planning a coup, a minority PM who is busy managing his chair by balancing all the forces that are keeping him there, PM’s rouge son spoilt by father’s power, the secret stories of army life, the power that lies with the people who are in shadows and never come to limelight, a beautiful wife who keeps balancing between the high profile father and the husband, the illegal accounts of rich and famous in middle east and Switzerland, the world of so called investment bankers, media battles, cricket and the obsession of politicians to be running the show, the real passion for the game, the late night parties and the page 3 circle of Delhi. All this brilliantly woven into a story that sometimes shocks you, sometimes amuses you and sometimes makes you think about a world that is not visible to you but you know very well that it exists.

The two heroes from his first book ‘Young Turks’ have been reduced to character actors in this book, though the author has skillfully maintained their characters. The third hero has been introduced and I am sure the three of them will feature in the next sequel, where should be expect a Christian or a Parsi hero being introduced. Author has moved ahead from his dreamy state to a more realistic one in this book, but nonetheless he remains a die hard optimist and like Hindi movies, in his stories good still wins eventually over evil. I like this optimism, as it leaves the reader with a hope in the end rather than getting disillusioned by the all that they read in the book.

Singh is definitely one of the best authors of the current times. The books are written intelligently, there are no loose ends and language is simple, lucid and there is no forced attempt to make it global. Author not only displays the good knowledge of the subject that he dealing with but also builds his characters very crisply. To me he is building up expectations from his readers, and serious readers can look forward to his future works. I am definitely looking forward to the next book in the series.

Priced at Rs 195/-, this is worth every paisa. Hachette, the publishers of this book had tried a new strategy with this book where they promised the money back if the reader did not like the book. I do not think they would have had to return any money, but I am keen to know how the strategy worked. Did it help the sales? For record sake, were there any actual returns? Just curious…

Go ahead, buy yourself a copy and read this book.

https://www.anureviews.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/book-1.jpghttps://www.anureviews.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/book-1-140x150.jpgAnuradha GoyalBook ReviewsFictionThis second book in the author’s Raisina Series takes you through the power corridors of the country through the eyes of a young second generation power broker. Told in first person the story takes you through the journey of this young man who comes from Sikh community, adding to...Book Reviews by Anuradha Goyal